Japan’s Nuclear Levels Still Too High for Safe Olympics

The Japanese national safety standard for allowable radioactivity is 0.23 microsieverts per hour. For a good example, Tokyo averages at about 0.04 microsieverts per hour.

Greenpeace urged Japan to abandon Olympic activities including the Olympic torch relay in Fukushima, the site of extensive radioactive damage from the 2011 tsunami. Based on reading as high as 1.7 microsieverts per hour measured at one meter above the surface, and a reading of 71 microsieverts per hour at the surface level.

In response, Japan argued that it read 0.111 microsieverts per hour at the main entrance one day, and one of the fields showed a rating of 0.085 microsieverts per hour.

Given that Japan has been very inconsistent in acting upon its nuclear waste policy, it is unclear whether the data from Japan can be trusted. It is also questionable as to whether Greenpeace’s data can be trusted, given the organization’s reputation.

It would be advisable for a neutral third-party such as the UN or the International Atomic Energy Agency to step in and provide a non-partisan data, as an average person safely absorbs about 3.65 microsieverts a year.

It would be advisable for a neutral third-party such as the UN or the International Atomic Energy Agency to step in and provide a non-partisan data, as an average person safely absorbs about 3.65 microsieverts a year.

Japan’s data may show that it is safe for olympic athletes to engage in sports in Fukushima, but if Greenpeace’s data is correct, then the international community is putting the lives of these valuable athletes in great danger.

코리일보/COREEDAILY

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